Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Top 10 Rising and Falling Buzzwords in Tech Job Postings Bloomberg Business

Some of the most popular tech buzzwords of a year ago, such as big data, no longer have the same cachet with job applicants, according to a study of more than 500,000 tech job postings. Older buzzwords are being replaced by newer terms, including artificial intelligence and real-time data. Among the top five buzzwords, only two were even on the map a year ago. Each term included in the study was measured using three main criteria: the number of people applying for a job containing the phrase, the percentage of those applicants with the skills and background to qualify, and the time it took to fill the role since the job was posted. The results were then ranked by changes in effectiveness from a year ago.

Artificial intelligence is one of the new tech buzzwords, with tech job applicants attracted by listings that mention AI. Over the past six months, the term's usage among the best-performing tech job listings has quintupled. Real-time data is also a hot new buzzword. Supposedly, this term conveys that the hiring company wants to build products based on the latest information, rather than just a lot of information. Other terms that are gaining in popularity include "high availability" and "robust and scalable." Also, thanks to the rising importance of diverse workplaces to many applicants, particularly in the tech industry, job postings benefit from a reference to "inclusiveness."

The term "big data" is the biggest loser in technology job ads. Two years ago, everything was about big data, but the term had started to drop off five or six months ago. Today, engineering jobs that mention "big data" perform 30% worse, on average, than those that do not. Also, corporate jargon turns off many applicants, so the term "virtual team," which refers to telecommuting, is more than 10 times as likely to appear in jobs with low applicant counts than in successful listings. Other buzzwords losing ground include "troubleshooting" and "subject matter expert."
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